Food & Nutrition

Foodies – and you know who they are – may be turning against quinoa, the healthy grain. It's not because they feel guilty for having made poor people in South America suffer. Instead, it's due to "processing."
Newer tests can substantially speed up the determination of the causative pathogens in outbreaks of foodborne illnesses. However, because they don't provide all the detail of older culturing methods, they could make it more difficult for clear epidemiological results. A combination of methods is likely the best way to go.
Just ahead of barbecue season, here's something to stress about: grilling and charring red meat, chicken, and fish at high temps could lead to high blood pressure, according to a recent study from the American Heart Association. But don't cancel your upcoming BBQ invites just yet — it's all in the way you cook your burger, and how often.
The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control on obesity trends are mixed. Adults – especially women – continued to gain, but the same wasn't true for younger folks. Maybe, just maybe, there's hope on the horizon for diminishing the obesity epidemic.  
Added sugars are the focus of the latest nutrition culture wars, with articles helping us find "hidden" sugars. You know, the ones listed on the ingredients labels. The problem isn't really added sugar — it's over-consumption.
You know you want it. The first genetically modified beer has been developed by researchers at UC Berkley. Let's lift a pint in their honor.
Coffee houses are virtually everywhere, and for good reason. Nearly two out of three people recently surveyed said that they consumed coffee the previous day. That's slightly up from a year ago, and approximately equal to the consumption figures from six years ago. But sipping homed-brew java is still America's favorite.
Aging can be associated with a loss of muscle mass and functional deficits. Recent research finds that while testosterone can help older men gain muscle, just adding more protein to the diet does not. Thus, there doesn't seem to be a reason to change protein requirements for seniors.
Recently on vacation abroad I was exposed to a conspiracy tale that went something like this: "I read this thing on Google that says corporations control science." As a result, one thing really stuck out: Americans are a whole lot more scientific than their counterparts in Europe.
In a recent episode of Keeping Up With The Kardashians, sisters Kim and Kourtney take some tests to figure out which one of them is healthier: Kourtney, who is strictly gluten-free, or Kim, who eats everything in moderation. 
Five months after having my son, I'm back to my pre-baby weight. But my BMI still says I'm overweight. Is this true?
This uniquely American tendency to assign racism where none exists has struck again in yet another bizarre way. And it's absurd to try to make the case that we are racist toward Chinese food, when the number of Chinese restaurants triples those of U.S. cultural icons such as McDonald's and Starbucks.