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CrossFit Inc.'s CEO Greg Glassman was once in a war on Coca-Cola - at least until it was revealed he was only in a war on Coca-Cola because Coke gave money to his competitors. Then he changed gears and claimed to be in a war against soda. But then it was revealed that he drinks a lot of soda - and a lot of margaritas - and switched gears to claiming he is not in a war on soda, he is in a war for public health, and simply believes that if a researcher has ever taken money from a company, they are unethical.

In the science community, when dealing with people who are either evangelists in a war they know little about or are simply anti-science, this is known as "moving the goalposts." Basically, you just keep changing your argument every time the old one is shown to be...

20160229_170934Yesterday I got a letter from the CEO of the exercise group CrossFit, Inc. His name is Greg Glassman and he discovered the perfect way to get my attention: Hard copy, in an over-sized envelope. I love getting mail. But most of the time it is opened by someone else and I never see it. However, a FedEx package will come to me because people assume it may be baseball season tickets or something.

I certainly always appreciate hearing from the public but his letter had enough misstatements and errors I had to wonder if it was a PR stunt. Since he included no contact information -- the letterhead says Washington, D.C. and I am...

1. In US News and World Report, they cover a publicity briefing by Greg Glassman, CEO of the Crossfit extreme exercise empire. Glassman is trying to generate some traction for his recent publicity stunt claiming he knows that soda causes diabetes, despite the fact that the evidence is similar to claiming spoons do. Yes, people with Type 2 diabetes are more likely to drink soda, but they also...well, you go ahead and make the other analogy, I don't need to spoon feed it to you.

Type 2 diabetes is directly related to obesity and that is simply related to calories. If we eliminated soda completely, it wouldn't reduce diabetes one...

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When wacky biased claims about pesticide residues in breast milk came out, it was derided as a silly diversion by desperate environmental groups who take their advice from Deniers For Hire at places like SourceWatch and U.S. Right To Know.

Anti-science activists trying to get GMO warning labels placed on competitors of the organic marketing groups that fund them had wisely avoided suggesting labels on things like alcohol or restaurant food. In Vermont, the list of labeling exemptions to protect Vermont businesses from the public's "right to know" is long and bizarre.

Pesticide...

Mexican-Obesity-050516When former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg was trying to convince scientists and the public that soda was a special cause of obesity and diabetes could be prevented with more taxes, it got tied up in litigation. Mexico liked that tax idea also and went ahead and implemented it without a pesky court striking their belief down as "capricious" and "arbitrary," the way it ended in the Big Apple.

Soda companies are like Big Tobacco, went the social engineering refrain. But that has been the same refrain used by an alarming number of people who are trying to control how everyone else behaves, and the...

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If you are not trying to sell a diet book or get on an afternoon medical news program, you probably don't think giving up a food group is a magic bullet for weight loss. Actually, it is. So is a cleanse. That is what crash diets are, even if they don't work in the long term.

In the last few years we also have been told by mainstream media that wheat is some kind of special food for creating obesity, and then others have said both sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup are.(1) A few...

Gary Ruskin, the chief junkyard dog of US Right To Know, an industry front group created by Organic Consumers Association to harass and intimidate scientists, has managed to pay-to-publish a Short Article which allows him to claim he has been in a peer-reviewed journal.

That has to be placed in context. In an open-access digital world, where thousands of predatory journals now exist which allow anyone to buy the right to claim they have been peer-reviewed, being peer-reviewed doesn't mean what it used to mean. If I gather five astrologers to review some article on astrology and put it in an online astrology...

If you want to find $23.9 billion in faux health nonsense, look at the $24 billion alternative medicine industry. And no alternative product has benefited from a health halo like marijuana has in recent years. There are claims it treats everything from glaucoma to pain to depression, and maybe it does for 10 or 20 percent of people or whatever else in the same placebo range as acupuncture does. Government bureaucrats are rushing to get it legally on the books to get more taxes so they turn a blind eye to the nonsensical claims about benefit. 

But when it comes to cancer marketing, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has finally drawn a line. They have issued warning letters to four companies - Greenroads Health, Natural Alchemist, That’s Natural! Marketing and Consulting, and...

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Why are saturated fats healthy again? Why do the latest nutritional guidelines still have a very low cap on salt despite all the contradictory data?

There is a lot of confirmation bias in nutrition and those end-oriented beliefs make it easy to unconsciously mold results to match the numbers to the goal, like doing surveys about food recall and subtly quantifying the results one way or the other. Then it's off to publish a diet book or become an expert on the latest...

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It s not a new finding that obesity among pregnant women can adversely affect the health of both mom and baby. But the risk of adverse effects such as hypertension, gestational diabetes, and emergency C-section may be much larger than previously thought, according to a study in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Dr. Fiona C. Denison and colleagues from the University...