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Experts have looked at the evidence condemning the weedkiller atrazine as a carcinogen and found it wanting.

A weight-of-evidence approach leads to the conclusion that there is no causal association between atrazine and cancer and that occasional positive results can be attributed to bias or chance, the scientists wrote in the European Journal of Cancer Prevention. Atrazine appears to be a good candidate for a category of herbicides with a probable absence of cancer risk. Atrazine should be treated for regulatory and public health purposes as an agent unlikely to pose a cancer risk to humans.

The four researchers were affiliated with the Tisch Cancer Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Harvard...

An editorial in today s Wall Street Journal notes, With the headlines full of oil spills and immigration, the Obama Administration's regulatory agenda is getting little attention. That's a mistake. Consider the Environmental Protection Agency's effort to revive an assault on atrazine, one of the oldest, most well-established agricultural chemicals on the market. Just this past week, the EPA held its third re-evaluation hearing on atrazine.

This editorial is right on target, says Dr. Ross. It basically points out that the plaintiffs bar and anti-chemical, anti-business activists are working hand in hand yet again...

In what ACSH s Dr. Gilbert Ross calls one of the worst studies ever, a team of researchers from the University of Texas School of Public Health reported in the Journal of Pediatrics that exposure to a widely used herbicide during pregnancy may raise the risk of a birth defect.

According to the findings, atrazine the most commonly used herbicide in the U.S. appeared to increase the risk of choanal atresia (an extremely rare congenital defect) by almost two-fold in pregnant women...

Syngenta, maker of the herbicide atrazine, just announced a settlement with litigants in a case based on allegations that the widely used chemical caused water contamination despite the fact that it s beensafely used by farmers for over fifty years.

Some may wonder, if atrazine is so safe and important to American agriculture, why did Syngenta decide to pay off the plaintiffs?

Good question. While we here at ACSH recognize that the settlement was a matter of business, not science, we still think that this concession to opportunistic lawyers and activist groups is yet another...

The FDA today began re-re-reevaluating AAtrex, Syngenta Crop Protection s brand name for the 50-year-old herbicide atrazine, which opponents allege is a potential carcinogen and endocrine disrupter. The EPA estimates that banning atrazine would cost more than $2 billion annually, while University of Chicago economist Don Coursey believes that a ban would lead to 21,000 to 48,000 jobs lost from corn production losses alone. Addressing fears over the presence of harmful chemicals in pesticide-treated foods,...

EU Parliament, StrasbourgAtrazine, one of the most effective and commonly used herbicides (weed-killers) in the world, is back in the news. Today s New York Times international business article discusses disparities in regulations that complicate Trans-Atlantic trade. Specifically referenced is the gulf that exists between American and European regulations of chemicals and pesticides, focusing on atrazine, which is produced by the Switzerland-based chemical...

America seems in the grip of chemophobia, the unfounded fear of chemicals. CNN recently served up specials entitled Toxic America and Toxic Childhood. The New Yorker had a piece fretting about the Plastic Panic. The President s Cancer Panel anguished about all the untested environmental chemicals many designated by them as carcinogens in our air, water and food. And there are more frightening (but scientifically baseless) chemical health scares to come.

For example, radical environmental activists now have the widely used herbicide atrazine on their radar screens. For them, new regulatory controls or an outright ban on the herbicide would be their dream come true. Why? Because as a May Wall Street Journal editorial put it, if (they) can take down atrazine...(they) can...

All the news that's fit to scare. That was the thrust of this weekend's New York Times article by Charles Duhigg entitled "Toxic Waters: Debating Just How Much Weed Killer Is Safe in Your Water Glass."

As president of the American Council on Science and Health, I have been following environmental and health media articles for some three decades -- seeing how they measure up in terms of "honors" for exaggerated risk, biased reporting, misrepresented science, and pure sensationalism. The Duhigg article is clearly a contender for the all-time worst.

Duhigg argues that the widespread use of the herbicide atrazine is polluting our supply of drinking water and putting us all -- but...

Third-Hand Smoke
A team of researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California wrote in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that nicotine in the residue of tobacco smoke – “third-hand smoke” – accumulates on surfaces and can react with nitrous acid to form carcinogens (as defined by high-dose rodent experiments)....

Atrazine, the herbicide most responsible for the well being of the cornfields across so much of the U.S. countryside, has once again been deemed a non-threat to human health. Most recently, the respected ongoing Agricultural Health Study (AHS) found no link between exposure to atrazine and overall cancer risk. The new research, published in the typically chemophobic, anti-pesticide journal, Environmental Health Perspectives, draws on the AHS s prospective cohort of over 57,000 licensed pesticide applicators (and their families) and is an extension of an earlier AHS analysis of cancer risk among self-reported atrazine users with six years of follow-up. Among the...