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It s always refreshing to see a journalist stand up for sound science, especially since it so rarely happens. That s why we d like to make note of Trevor Butterworth s latest op-ed in Forbes. In it, Butterworth intelligently critiques New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristoff s hollow, politically driven campaign against chemicals.

Kristoff s latest column pits Big Chem against environmental activists, who are chirping yet again about the dangers of Bisphenol A (BPA). Yet Butterworth astutely points out how Kristoff reports only on studies from the very small environmental activist groups that always seem to find data against the use of BPA, no matter how flawed the source. He seems unaware of the many non-industry funded studies or regulatory agency...

ACSH would like to tip its hat to Trevor Butterworth for his insightful op-ed, “Fear In A Can,” in The Daily. Unlike most media outlets who report on the dangers of bisphenol A (BPA), citing insignificant so-called studies, Butterworth actually examines the science behind the chemical. And what did he find? The German Society of Toxicology, the World Health Organization and the European Union’s Food Safety Authority all pored over thousands of studies and concluded that BPA is safe.

Butterworth then asks, “But do the U.S. media report what these critical reviews and risk assessments find? Overwhelmingly, no; instead, tiny studies that lead...

Screen Shot 2013-12-23 at 1.10.07 PMIt is a pleasure to give a shout out to commentator par excellence and ACSH friend Trevor Butterworth.

In his recent Forbes op-ed Butterworth sticks his arm deep into the muck created by the mixing of science and politics, and comes up with a disturbing conclusion that there is a disconnect between what scientists think should be done in assessing risks (of chemicals, for example) and what really happens.

Butterworth s premise, based on a...

Screen Shot 2014-04-29 at 12.38.34 PMThe always dead-on Trevor Butterworth once again hit the bullseye in his op-ed in Forbes.com. And in his unique way, he makes the perennial critics of BPA a component of the plastic that seals canned foods look rather foolish.

ACSH s Dr. Josh Bloom is in complete agreement: After reading this piece, it would seem rather obvious that the dozens of studies and papers on the...

Top health stories: A shout out to the brilliant Trevor Butterworth and his take on the BPA scare, why you shouldn't run off to the nearest vitamin store before reading our take on Glucosamine, and the real uses and mis-uses, for the Body Mass Index (BMI).

Trevor Butterworth wrote a detailed history for the non-profit Statistical Assessment Service (STATS) of the falling-out between toxicology and endocrinology experts and the anti-BPA activist faction led by Dr. Frederick vom Saal. The outcome, Butterworth writes, is that, “[t]he panic over the chemical bisphenol A (BPA) is not only unjustified, it has reached a point where the failure to accept basic, rational principles in scientific research is damaging toxicology itself, wasting taxpayers’ money, and undermining scientific progress.”

“Butterworth cites as the beginning of the controversy a study published in the journal Toxicological Sciences, which showed that...

138829_6871The Harvard School of Public Health in collaboration with the Silent Spring Institute (yes, you guessed it, named after the infamous environmentalist Rachel Carson), just released a list of 102 chemicals as critical for breast cancer research and prevention. They did use rodent studies as the basis of this list, and as we have said before and Trevor Butterworth says in his article in Forbes.com, it is very hard to make conclusions about...

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We at ACSH have written countless pieces on the absolute garbage science surrounding BPA a chemical that has been in use for more than 50 years, and is used in the manufacturing process of various plastics.

So, it is only natural that we give a huge shout-out to Trevor Butterworth, a journalist and master junk science (especially statistics)...

Screen Shot 2014-04-09 at 1.05.06 PMAt ACSH we shout a lot. Sometimes even at each other. But most of the time it takes the form of shoutouts to like-minded writers and websites (and there aren t that many) that believe that real science, not agenda-driven nonsense, should actually be used to guide public health policy.

Today s shoutout #1 goes to the prolific (and brilliant) Trevor Butterworth an outspoken (and then some) critic of junk science, especially intentional junk science.

Butterworth s new...

Readers who turn to ABC as their source of news will get a very skewed impression of distinguished professor Dr. David Allison, head of the Section on Statistical Genetics at the University of Alabama and director of the National Institutes of Health-funded Nutrition Obesity Research Center. An ABC News article by Dan Harris and Maggy Patrick which was apparently pulled from the national TV newscast at the last moment accuses Dr. Allison of accepting money from the food and beverage industry in order to poke holes in the scientific consensus on whether soda consumption significantly contributes to the obesity epidemic. Basing his conclusions on sound science, Dr. Allison has...