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Vaping continues to be a controversial topic pitting harm reduction against harm elimination; two goals that seem incompatible. But in writing about the effect of tobacco flavor on our blood vessels I discovered that vaping as practiced is not necessarily vaping as discussed. My initial response to the study of tobacco flavors was that studying the effect of flavors was too reductionist; you need to consider the impact of flavoring in the context of smoking or vaping to understanding how all the chemicals interact. After all, who just vapes flavor?

As it turns out, quite a few teens. Most teens are vaping flavor alone, not tobacco or nicotine. An NIH study [1] found that among the 28%...

In the wake of over 1,000 injuries and nearly two dozen deaths linked to vaping (probably all or most of which were due to misusing the devices), the public is right to be concerned about the safety of e-cigarettes. Given that we have covered this issue in some depth, we wanted to provide a resource that answers as many questions as possible and provides links to our other articles.

(1) Is vaping safe?

Not to sound like a lawyer, but it depends on what is meant by "safe." Nothing in life is 100% safe. According to CDC data, in 2017, more than 1,000 Americans fell off a bed and died. So, the appropriate question is, "Is vaping safer than smoking?" (Actually, a better question is, "Is vaping less...

Dr. Jeffrey Singer's piece originally appeared on the Cato Institute website. It is being reprinted with permission. 

Last summer, Brian Besser, Drug Enforcement Administration District Agent in charge of Utah, told reporters that Mexican drug cartels have “all of a sudden gotten involved in this vape cartridge industry, and reasonably so, because they know they are going to make money off of it.

This makes sense. Prohibition incentivizes innovations in the production and distribution of illicit substances to make detection more difficult. It is very hard to...

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NEW YORK, N.Y. – In the midst of a growing, national concern over vaping devices and hundreds of health problems across the country reportedly associated with them, there is an urgent need for public health guidance.

Americans are looking for answers on this important issue, and most importantly to avoid getting sick themselves.

That is why the American Council on Science and Health, a leading pro-science consumer advocacy organization founded in 1978, has developed 5 sensible vaping guidelines for public safety.

  1. If a tobacco smoker is unable to quit, switching to vaping is a good health decision. The most important reason is that while nicotine is addictive, it is the combustion...

Vaping devices such as e-cigarettes should not be used for fun. Getting oneself addicted to nicotine is not a smart idea. That is why these devices should not be used by non-smokers, particularly young people. Instead, the only legitimate use is as medical devices to help smokers quit. If used exclusively in that way, vaping can be a powerful tool in the public health battle against tobacco*.

Unfortunately, scientific data and logic are missing from the public debate over vaping. Worse, two of the organizations we entrust to protect our health, the FDA and CDC, have royally screwed up their policy on the safety of vaping.

FDA Warns Juul for Claiming that Vaping Is Safer than Smoking

On Monday, the FDA issued a...

Despite the CDC's recent confirmation that vaping nicotine wasn't responsible for an outbreak of lung illnesses around the US, the campaign against e-cigarette liquid hasn't ceased. Some anti-smoking groups, politicians and  public health experts continue pushing to ban most flavored liquids used in e-cigarettes, because they supposedly entice non-smoking teenagers to take up vaping.

In order to save children from a lifetime of addiction, so the argument goes, we need to ban flavored e-liquids. Forbes contributor and Duke University behavioral scientist Peter Ubel summed up the case against e-liquids in a...

US drug policy is just plain nuts. Nowhere is this more obvious than when one compares how opioids and marijuana products are "regulated." Marijuana now gets a free pass while the DEA is kicking in the doors of physicians who prescribe one extra Vicodin pill.

And, given the popularity of vaping it is not surprising that marijuana chemicals (1) are being vaped like crazy, despite the fact that these chemicals and/or additives have done serious, sometimes fatal, lung damage. To make matters (much) worse, fentanyl is now showing up in vaping solutions.

 

What a mess.

Seriously? Yep. A...

On the issue of vaping, it is quite easy to make either advocates or critics angry. What is difficult is to anger both simultaneously. Yet, the Trump Administration has found a way to do just that.

It shouldn't come as a surprise that the administration wanted to take some sort of action on vaping. Because of his brother's unsuccessful battle with alcoholism, President Trump is a teetotaler. Obviously, his family was deeply affected by addiction, and he wants to protect other families from it.

However, the issue of vaping is extremely tricky. On the one hand, e-cigarettes are an excellent public health tool in the fight against smoking. There are hospitals in the UK...

Here's where we appeared in recent days.

(1) Dr. Josh Bloom and Dr. Alex Berezow both spoke on panels hosted by the American Cleaning Institute. As its name suggests, ACI is a trade organization representing the cleaning products industry. Both discussed how activists routinely engage in chemophobia and scaremongering to frighten people away from products that are safe when used properly.

(2) Dr. Berezow's article criticizing UCSF Professor Stanton Glantz for saying that tobacco users "would be better off just smoking" instead of vaping was cited by Dr. Eugene Gu in the UK's...

It hasn't been a good year for U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams.

Back in July, Dr. Adams endorsed giving post-operative patients Tylenol instead of morphine. Let's think about surgery for a moment. It often involves cutting through a person's skin and muscle, poking and pulling at stuff inside, and then sewing it all up like a patch on worn jeans. It's painful, and a couple of Tylenol probably won't cut it for many people.

Worse, Dr. Adams supported his statement by referring to an absolute dumpster fire of a paper published by authors in Iran. The paper concluded that Tylenol was just as good as morphine at managing post-operative pain, but it suffered from a few flaws: The sample size was pathetically small and there was no control group. At the time, my colleague Dr....