Food & Nutrition

You know you want it. The first genetically modified beer has been developed by researchers at UC Berkley. Let's lift a pint in their honor.
Coffee houses are virtually everywhere, and for good reason. Nearly two out of three people recently surveyed said that they consumed coffee the previous day. That's slightly up from a year ago, and approximately equal to the consumption figures from six years ago. But sipping homed-brew java is still America's favorite.
Aging can be associated with a loss of muscle mass and functional deficits. Recent research finds that while testosterone can help older men gain muscle, just adding more protein to the diet does not. Thus, there doesn't seem to be a reason to change protein requirements for seniors.
Recently on vacation abroad I was exposed to a conspiracy tale that went something like this: "I read this thing on Google that says corporations control science." As a result, one thing really stuck out: Americans are a whole lot more scientific than their counterparts in Europe.
In a recent episode of Keeping Up With The Kardashians, sisters Kim and Kourtney take some tests to figure out which one of them is healthier: Kourtney, who is strictly gluten-free, or Kim, who eats everything in moderation. 
Five months after having my son, I'm back to my pre-baby weight. But my BMI still says I'm overweight. Is this true?
This uniquely American tendency to assign racism where none exists has struck again in yet another bizarre way. And it's absurd to try to make the case that we are racist toward Chinese food, when the number of Chinese restaurants triples those of U.S. cultural icons such as McDonald's and Starbucks.
Our statistical analysis suggests that the further north Americans live, the likelier they may be to drink excessively. Is it due to the long, dark winter nights?
Environmental Working Group, which promotes fear and doubt about the (non-organic) American food supply, tries to pretend it isn't industry-driven. But given the group's cozy relationship with industry, it's no surprise officials have named Shazi Visram, a top organic baby food company founder, to its board.
A new paper touting great news is sure to be embraced by the organic customer base. There is just one problem: The research was funded by industry, the very thing organic consumers say is wrong with industrial farming. Organic food corporations and trade groups are clearly a lot more like 1950s Big Tobacco companies than Big Tobacco is today.
We've been discussing the uselessness of healthy people taking vitamin/mineral supplements for lo, these many years. But if you don't believe us, just see what some doctors from Harvard are advising their colleagues about who really needs vitamins, and when.
Just when you think you've heard it all, a new one comes down the road. Here's an in-depth analysis of an unprecedented Twitter discussion.