Food & Nutrition

If you believe the hype that the Organic Consumers Association puts out, you believe that organic foods are better for you than the conventionally raised variety. And you likely also believe that animals raised in line with organic principles are also treated more humanely. Oops!
When you need a boost of Vitamin C, we bet you never think to eat some bell peppers! Here are five foods that are higher in Vitamin C than oranges!
The national media is alive with the report; coffee intake is good for you! And evidently, the more the better. The data, of course, is a bit more – shall we say – nuanced.
New research indicates that extra-virgin olive oil may not be the pure, wholesome maiden you've been anticipating for your dinner night. 
Can we prevent global warming by substituting beans, which, as compared to beef, produce less greenhouse gases? Here's the underlying hypothesis.
Good news: more of us are walking than we were even 10 years ago, and over 60 percent of both adult men and women report regular walking. That still leaves us with a large proportion of couch potatoes; certain demographic groups do lag behind. Perhaps the message that needs better targeting: even moderate activity can be beneficial.
Preservatives help keep our food supply safe and reduce food waste. Apparently, Panera Bread is unaware of this.
One phenomenon that continues to mystify physicians and healthcare professionals alike is the "obesity paradox," the idea that significant extra weight can actually be beneficial and provide protection in some circumstances.  For years, studies have been released that produced competing findings – some that supported its existence, others that undermined it – only serving to muddy the waters in this area of research. 
It makes some sense that over-consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (sodas or fruit juices, for example) could be linked to both obesity and the risk of type 2 diabetes. But artificially-sweetened beverages? The ones with fewer calories? Still, another paper tries to support that link — but leaves us wondering about the lack of logic in this approach.
Sunburn is not only painful, but can be a precursor to skin cancer, and thus is to be avoided as much as possible. But if you're unable to avoid too much exposure, a preliminary study suggests that vitamin D just might be able to help.
Turmeric, and its constituent curcumin are widely touted to be one of the wonders of traditional Chinese medicine, treating or curing everything from ankle sprains to cancer. But a recent careful review of the scientific data undercuts all these claims, labeling these compounds  as IMPs — invalid metabolic panaceas. Enjoy turmeric in your curry, but don't expect it to save you life!
Could it be that the Mediterranean Diet works best for those individuals raised or genetically associated with the Mediterranean? Put another way,are traditional diets, the ones consumed by our genetic ancestors keep us healthier?