Harm Reduction

Clinical Decision Rules help physicians make judgments when they are uncertain. Unlike the Ten Commandments, they may grow less helpful as they age, even when based on sound, verified science.
E-cigarettes remain controversial. They are frequently offered as an effective bridge to smoking cessation. But that path may be harder than we anticipated.
When it comes to delivery location, the stakes are too high to add a risk factor or hurdle to childbirth. Hospital births are the safest choice.
Professional societies annually release guidelines designed to standardize and improve care. But implementing those standards is harder than they -- or frankly, most of us -- think. A concerted effort to improve surgical care across the United Kingdom is falling short.
Tule fog is a very dense fog found in California's Central Valley, and it's the source of many traffic accidents and fatalities annually. But over the last 30 years Tule fog is seen less often, and for shorter times. Apparently, it's not a result of climate change but of improving air quality.
Penetrating traumas take on a unique trajectory. They can be erratic, asymmetrical and variable in depth and extent. So real estate in the body, and good fortune, matter most.
A new study channels Frederick Taylor, father of the “scientific management” of the workforce, bringing a stopwatch into the hospital to report on how physicians -- in this case -- first-year internal medicine residents, spend their day. Spoiler alert: they don't spend it at bedside.
Whether occupationally, recreationally, or induced by a run-of-the-mill activity, ocular issues involving objects is not rare. And the summer is a prime time for things, propelled by the wind, to land in the eye.
The current troubles plaguing the giant airline manufacturer reveal that a greater societal problem. We are increasingly the servant -- rather than the master -- of our technologies.
In the same way second-hand smoke characterized a personal decision in the context of a public health hazard, can a stronger case be made for second-hand alcohol abuse?
One of the most important driving safety tips is to never swerve if an animal jumps in front of your car. Dog, cat, deer, raccoon -- don't swerve. Although it's an extremely natural instinct, it's also potentially deadly. If you swerve, you could hit a tree or an oncoming vehicle. But there's one exception to this general rule.
Many hospitals have been consolidated and merged into networks. They are frequently anchored by a "Big-Name Hospital" found on U.S. News and World Report's "Honor Roll," touted as the best of the best. But does going to a network-affiliated hospital provide the same care?