Search

A recent news article claimed that "organic" furniture is less likely to kill you in a house fire because "synthetic" materials will burn up to 8 times faster. It was accompanied by a video from the Underwriter Laboratories (UL) certification company (1) and a quote from a fire captain in Arkansas (2) which suggested they were both affirming the claim was true. 

Let's find out.

According to the National Fire Protection Agency, there is a home fire every 86 seconds. That is 1,000 per day in a country of 330,000,000 people. Cooking is the leading cause of home fires and injuries, but home fire-related deaths often involve furniture - because they often...

A class of brominated flame retardants known as polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) are under assault from environmental activists and regulators both in the United States and overseas. Flame retardants give people more time to escape a fire by delaying flashover, the explosive-like eruption of flames responsible for most of the fatalities and property damage in residential fires. PBDEs are particularly effective flame retardants and have long been widely used in the manufacture of televisions and other electrical equipment, furniture, and mattresses.

...

A class of brominated flame retardants known as polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) are under assault from environmental activists and regulators both in the United States and overseas. Flame retardants give people more time to escape a fire by delaying flashover, the explosive-like eruption of flames responsible for most of the fatalities and property damage in residential fires. PBDEs are particularly effective flame retardants...

New York, NY -- August 10, 2006. Anti-chemical environmental activists even want to ban chemicals that save lives in fires, according to a new report. A class of brominated flame retardants known as polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) are under assault from environmental activists and regulators both in the United States and overseas. So warns the non-profit science education group the American Council on Science on Health (ACSH) in its new report, Brominated Flame Retardants: A Burning Issue.

Flame retardants give people more time to escape a fire by delaying flashover, the explosive-like eruption of flames responsible for most of the fatalities and...

A new report dredges up some environmental myths about flame retardants and then says poor people are most at risk - but it could really mean poor people aren't scaremongered by epidemiologists in academia as easily as everyone else, even if it's due to economic necessity that government-funded university employees only witness in the abstract.

In 2016, there is no reason to defend the brominated flame retardants known as polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) - they are already banned in various states, like California. Which makes it even stranger that a paper in Environmental Science & Technology invokes them as a possible...well, no one knows if they are a possible anything, the authors just...

MORNING DISPATCH 10/10/08: Tobacco, Infections, HIV, and Rights for Plants

ACSH's harm reduction approach attracts criticism
We received many comments yesterday about our support for R.J. Reynolds' new smokeless tobacco products, some taking issue with our harm reduction approach to quitting smoking. "While, in an ideal world, getting all smokers to simply stop being addicted to nicotine would be an easily attainable goal, this is not likely to happen in the real world," reiterates ACSH's Dr. Elizabeth Whelan.

New smokeless products, which dissolve in a user's mouth to deliver an...