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Sunday's New York Times featured a front-page article by Michael Moss discussing the food industry’s efforts to avoid regulatory limits on the salt content of processed foods: “By all appearances, this is a moment of reckoning for salt. High blood pressure is rising among adults and children. Government health experts estimate that deep cuts in salt consumption could save 150,000 lives a year.”

“The article made no mention whatsoever of the fact that there could be contrary opinion of salt as a leading cause of hypertension,” says ACSH’s Dr. Elizabeth Whelan. “They take it as a given that salt alone is causing all of these...

The World Cancer Research Fund is criticizing the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) for accepting sponsorship deals with Coca-Cola, McDonalds, and Budweiser for the 2010 World Cup, claiming that the companies advertisements promote unhealthy products.

The World Cancer Research Fund believes that these ads will negatively impact children, says ACSH's Jeff Stier. What they don t mention is that Coca-Cola and McDonalds offer healthier food options as well as their standard products. Also, I doubt FIFA intentionally turned down advertisement offers from healthy food vendors in favor of these companies. They simply accepted the offers that raise the...

A study published in the journal Nature Medicine claims that a vaccine appears to have prevented breast cancer in lab mice. The mice, genetically prone to develop breast cancer, were injected with a vaccine designed to provoke an immune response to a protein found in most breast tumors. None of the mice immunized with the vaccine developed breast cancer, compared to the control group in which every mouse developed breast cancer.
According to BBC News, the immunologist that lead the research, Dr. Vincent Tuohy of the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, said, “If it works in humans the way it works in mice, this will be monumental. We...

The UN s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) predicted yesterday that worldwide cancer deaths would increase to 13.2 million by 2030, nearly twice the 2008 figure. IARC s new database also projects a shift of the cancer burden from wealthier to poorer nations.

Reuters scary headline, Cancer will kill 13.2 million a year by 2030 is misleading, as is often the case, says ACSH's Dr. Gilbert Ross. The world s population, by becoming healthier, is also aging and thus susceptible to increasing cancer rates. Further, reducing the rate of childhood and infectious diseases in developing countries allows more people to survive to adulthood and get cancer.

ACSH's Jeff Stier agrees: It s hard...

As part of their initiative to bring transparency to the FDA s tobacco advisory committee examining potential regulatory policies for menthol cigarettes, dissolvable tobacco products and other issues, the watchdog group Center for Regulatory Effectiveness (CRE) launched a Studies and Concepts Under Review forum that allows experts to analyze the FDA s reports on the issue of menthol in cigarettes.

The FDA report is consistent with earlier studies, says ACSH's Jeff Stier. They re studying whether or not menthol is dangerous, and the question is: What do you mean by dangerous? If they re asking if menthol itself is toxic, the overwhelming evidence gathered over the years indicates that it s not. If they re asking if menthol can...

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has officially released its updated list of fruits and vegetables ranked by potential pesticide exposure. As ACSH's Jeff Stier noted when he got a sneak-peek at the list in April, blueberries and peaches are cited among the worst offenders.

“This undermines the public health goal of getting people to eat more fruits and vegetables by intentionally scaring them away from a wide variety of healthy produce,” says Stier, who, at his own risk, ate fresh blueberries and peaches for breakfast.

“This list is also contrary to well-established scientific knowledge that ...

A new urine test may detect prostate cancer better than current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood tests and rectal exams, according to research presented Tuesday at the American Urological Association in San Francisco.

“Researchers found that the urine test — which looks for a string of RNA called PCA3 — had a specificity of 78 percent; i.e., 78 percent of men who tested abnormal actually had prostate cancer, whereas the PSA test has a specificity of just 21 percent,” says ACSH's Dr. Gilbert Ross. “The problem with the PSA test is that it catches a very high percentage of men who do not have dangerous prostate cancer, including men who have an inflamed prostate or indolent prostate cancer...

CNN has an interesting video promoting their apocalyptic Toxic America report, which begins tonight.

This promotion is bizarre, says ACSH's Jeff Stier. They re showing people walking around in haz-mat suits, obviously trying to be funny. We think it s funny because we know that environmental chemicals aren t a serious problem, but they say they actually believe that those chemicals are causing cancer and death, so it s weird that they would promote this in such a mocking way.

ACSH s Dr. Elizabeth Whelan was interviewed for the second night of the program, which airs tomorrow.

Whelan argues that the public should focus on proven health issues, such as the dangers of cigarettes and obesity and the need for bicycle helmets and other protective equipment. As for chemicals in plastics, Whelan says, What the country needs is a national psychiatrist.

To illustrate what Whelan says is a misguided focus on manufactured chemicals, her organization has constructed a dinner menu filled with natural foods, and you can find a carcinogen or an endocrine-disrupting chemical in every course for instance, tofu and soy products are filled with plant-based estrogens that could affect hormonal balance. Just because you find something in the urine doesn t mean that it s a hazard, Whelan says. Our understanding of risks and benefits is distorted. BPA helps protect food...